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News & Views

39. STEPHANIE MOORHOUSE

Training through injury, body shaming and delayed puberty were just some of the challenges that faced retired gymnast Stephanie Moorhouse throughout her career from the age of 4 to 18. At the height of her career, Steph would train up to 40 hours per week which saw her win a gold medal at the 2002 Commonwealth Games, a bronze medal at the 2003 World Championships and compete at the 2004 Athens Olympics. Steph joins host Sam Squiers to discuss the demands on young gymnasts who peak in their teen years, transitioning to life after elite sport and her response to the Australian Human Rights Commission report into gymnastics which revealed a culture of abuse, misconduct and bullying.

38. PEGGY O’NEAL – The Puma Fearless Series

President of the Richmond Football Club, Peggy O’Neal, wants support for women and girls to pursue careers in sport, on and off the field.

Peggy became a Richmond Football Club member after moving to the suburb from the USA and developing a love for the sport and the Club. She’s progressed from being a member, to sitting on the Richmond board, to becoming the AFL’s first female president. In that time, she’s seen the establishment of Richmond’s AFLW side and the men’s first premiership win in 37 years.

Peggy joins Sam Squiers to discuss the growth of the AFLW, creating pathways for other women to take on leadership positions in sport, and how it felt to see the Tigers win a premiership in 2017 after a 37-year drought (and two more premierships since then).

37. ROSIE KING – The Puma Fearless Series

CEO of Netball Victoria and Melbourne Vixens, Rosie King OAM wants to see the Suncorp Super Netball competition expand and provide more opportunities for elite netballers.

Rosie has held leadership roles in some of Australia and New Zealand’s largest companies, but it’s Netball Victoria where she’s been able to have the greatest impact on women’s sport.

Rosie joins Sam Squiers to discuss getting her first taste of CEO leadership at the Geelong Football Club, changing misconceptions about netball and what needs to happen for the Super Netball competition to grow.

36. SABRINA FREDERICK – The Puma Fearless Series

Marquee AFLW player Sabrina Frederick wants her sport to professionalise. Sabrina fell in love with AFL after moving from England to Western Australia as a kid but was shocked to learn she couldn’t play Australia’s national sport at the top level. To continue playing, Sabrina joined the women’s team when she was in her early teens and moved across the country to play for the Brisbane Lions in the first season of the AFLW. Sabrina joins Sam Squiers to discuss finding her love for the game again after two Grand Final losses, finding confidence through sport and how she is using her platform and profile to be a powerful voice for fight for equality.

35. ALI BRIGGINSHAW – The Puma Fearless Series

Jillaroos and Brisbane Broncos captain Ali Brigginshaw wants the women’s game to become professional. Growing up as the only girl in the boys’ team, Ali was told she had no future in the sport so she never imagined she could turn rugby league into a career. Ali joins Sam Squiers to discuss fighting for the growth of the women’s game, why it’s important for young boys to look up to female athletes and how a photo of her kissing her girlfriend on the sidelines ended up in the paper.

34. LIZ CLAY – The Puma Fearless Series

100m hurdle champion Liz Clay wants more pathways for young athletes trying to make a career in athletics. Breaking her foot before the 2014 World Junior Championships forced Liz Clay to stay on the sidelines, missing a crucial event for her progression as a junior athlete and foreshadowing her injury-plagued career. Liz joins Sam Squiers to discuss moving from Sydney to the Gold Coast to be coached by hurdles legend Sharon Hannan, the media coverage of athletics compared to team sports and how she’s remained motivated in spite of setbacks.

33. JEMMA MI MI – The Puma Fearless Series

Queensland Firebird Jemma Mi Mi wants to see Indigenous culture embedded into netball every day of the year, not just during the Indigenous Round.

As the face of Suncorp Super Netball’s 2020 Indigenous Round, Jemma wanted to be on court, not on the bench. But as the minutes passed by, Jemma (and the rest of Australia) realised she wouldn’t get to play a minute of the game, sparking an important conversation about netball’s record with their Indigenous players.

Jemma joins Sam Squiers to discuss what she wants to see from Indigenous Round in the future, how she’s found confidence through sport and becoming a role model for the next generation of netballers.

32. ASH WERNER

Accidentally qualifying for the national bobsleigh team two years before the 2018 Winter Olympics changed the course of Ash Werner’s sporting career. Ash joins Sam Squiers to discuss leaving behind a successful career in Rugby 7’s to take a chance on bobsleigh, missing out on the 2018 Winter Olympics (despite qualifying) and the concussion that rocked her for over two years.

31. SAM WALLACE

Growing up in a small town in Trinidad & Tobago, NSW Swifts goal shooter Sam Wallace never imagined she’d be living and playing in Australia. Sam Wallace joins Sam Squiers to discuss playing college basketball in the USA (and why she gave it up to move home to Trinidad), the surprising intensity of Swifts’ training and losing her Dad a few days after winning the 2019 Suncorp Super Netball grand final.

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